Tag Archives: elearning

contest

Contest 26: Share the gift of eLearning!

For Community Contest 26, create a short eLearning module highlighting something you new you learning in Instructional Design, eLearning, or Lectora. Did you master actions? Or find a new and interesting way to use variables? How about learning to add extra code in your course? It could be as simple as designing or creating something you’re really proud of. Share it with your peers and tell us why!

Art & Science of E-Learning

Design is a critical aspect of creating engaging and effective learning experiences. Unfortunately for learners, too many online courses are decorated instead of thoughtfully designed. The result is often boring, unattractive and ineffectual. Mike Taylor from Mindset Digital is here to help you avoid boring eLearning.

This session will explore how anyone, even non-designers can apply some proven principles to intentionally design courses that audiences will love and learn from. This session will explore design principles which have been proven to improve learning results along with easy to implement examples—even for non-designers.

Performance Support

Moving From eLearning to Performance Support

Performance support is a term that we hear pretty often in eLearning circles these days. But what exactly does it entail, and how does it differ from traditional eLearning? Delivery and tracking of performance support is another big differentiator, as you won’t have tests, and you need to get information to where the users are doing their work, rather than on a desktop.

Presented by John Blackmon, Trivantis CTO, this session will take an in-depth look at what makes content performance support, and how you can not only utilize existing training materials as performance support but also how to use a single source to provide both traditional training and performance support. You’ll also see how you can track usage patterns of your content, even when it is used as performance support.

In this session, you will learn:

How performance support differs from eLearning
How you can repurpose traditional eLearning to be used as performance support
How best to deliver performance support
How to track performance support