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    Profile photo of Erica Hunter
    Erica Hunter
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    curious george
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    @beeps

    If formatting is an issue, you can render the text as an image (text > properties > text > check “convert to image”)

    I don’t think this is a good solution, but the way text renders can really vary by browser. Converted text can’t be read by a screen reader, so accessible alternatives are needed.

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    #315203 Score: 1
    Profile photo of Erica Hunter
    Erica Hunter
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    curious george
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    @beeps

    For food cooling, how about doing a scenario and flipping it around?

    Suzie cooked X and needs to cool it for storage. How should she do that?

    • Put it in the fridge
    • Add ice and stir
    • etc

    If they pick the wrong answer, it can be fun to play out the consequence. I can’t remember where I saw it, but I saw a sample activity along this lines (something about eating spoiled food). If the learner picked the wrong answer, the feedback said something like “you spent the night sick from food poisoning, since X bacteria thrives in Y environment.”

    That way, instead of telling the learner the answer (which is easy to dismiss) they will have to think about the answer. The best wrong answers would be common mistakes people make when cooling foods.

    At the end of the activity set, summarize the scenario(s) with a list of key tips.

    If you do a few scenarios that cover the big lessons, this will make a nice little module that is engaging and informative.

    For the measurements, how about providing the PDF as a reference. Then say something like “you are making a cake but are missing half of your measuring spoons/cups. Using what you have, measure out each ingredient.” They can use the reference sheet to look up the answer (much like someone would in real life) or they can guess and hope the cake turns out. I’d have to think that one through some more but that might be a starting point.

    I usually start by thinking about what the learner will do with what they are learning. Sometimes that can help spark some ideas for ways to make the content fun.

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    #315884 Score: 1
    Profile photo of Erica Hunter
    Erica Hunter
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    curious george
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    @beeps

    This might not be the best method, but you could make a separate question for each drop. That way, if the item isn’t placed in the drop zone it goes with it will snap back to the starting point.

    I attached the file so you can see what I did. I didn’t edit the drop zone graphic, but I copied the question and removed the extra zones. The correct drag is above each box. You’ll see if you drag them down that they will only snap if they are correct. Otherwise they will snap back.

    If you go this route, edit your image so each color is it’s own image that can be used for a drop zone. You can they lay them out how you want them on the page.

    Erica

     

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    1. snap-demo.zip
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Erica Hunter

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@beeps

active 1 year, 8 months ago